Equipment eStore

Welcome to the equipment section of the Camino de Santiago Guide, one of the important sections. Below is a checklist that allows you easy access to the Camino de Santiago Guide Equipment eStore. Here you can find everything essential that you need on do your trek.

Bringing the right gear can easily determine whether you will have a buen Camino or terrible hike.
In the following links I have given my personal recommendations for equipment based on my own personal experience with these items or from second hand reviews of people I met while doing the hike. Use this Equipment checklist below to help you pack the right gear for your Camino de Santiago.

Equipment Checklist

ITEM COMMENTS QTY
Boots High cut boots help prevent and reduce the number of sprains or bends that can injure your ankle.

1

Backpack A 50L backpack should be sufficient for carrying all of your equipment without being too heavy itself.

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Walking Sticks The walking stick is so important because it essentially feels like a third leg. I found that at times it was easier to lean into my walk and move forward. So much of your weight is placed onto the end of the stick than on your legs that you can really walk a lot farther with a walking stick.

2

Hats When you walk, you either face in the direction of the sun or have the sun beating down on your back. A hat helps with this.

1

Sleeping Bag Liner The albergues and hostels you sleep at all provide a thin sheet for the pillow and bed. The only problem is that the quality of this thin sheet is not very good. It’s unlikely, but you can still get bed bug bites and be exposed to other bacteria on the bed. The best defense against this is to use a sleeping bag liner, not a sleeping bag. A regular sleeping bag is too bulky and is used to sleep outdoors. All you really need is the cotton casing to sleep in. Choose one of the cheaper ones under $30. That should be sufficient.

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Camera A camera is one of the things that you do not want to worry about but always want ready to go if you find yourself with a nice view. Here is a list of some of the cameras at good prices.

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Flashlight A flashlight is essential primarily during all early mornings when you’re getting up at your hostel. You want to avoid stepping over other hikers and their gear. As well, it will help you read signs to find your way back along the path. It is important to bring a small, yet powerful light. LED flashlights are best at this.

1

Reading Reading is a great way to pass the time on the Camino. Whether it’s a Camino de Santiago Guide book or a novel. Carrying this is definitely worth the weight. Just make sure it’s not too heavy.

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Socks Socks are what prevent you from getting blisters. When you walk the skin on your feet rub constantly on the fabric of your socks, and if you have poor socks you can develop blisters over time. Make sure the socks are breathable and anti-blister!

3

Jacket Jackets are important for the occasional few days when it’s either rainy or cold. This especially does happen during the spring/summer if you walk the Camino Frances, which is in Northern Spain. Even if its light rain, the smallest amount of rain will greatly “dampen” your walking experience. Thus bring a good and light rain jacket.

1

Shirts Typically, you can wear any kind of shirt you want. But during the main walking season of spring-summer, the kind of shirt you wear can be quite important. I recommend wearing something sporty because these types of clothes are very breathable and dry quickly.  If you only take 2 shirts, you can easily clean and dry one of your shirts on your back while you’re walking.

2

Pants Pants eventually become one of the dirtiest and most useful items of clothing you can take. DO NOT WEAR JEANS! Usually it helps to bring at least 2 pieces of leg wear. What’s recommended on the Camino are cargo pants with the ability to convert into shorts. This provides versatility, comfort, and utility with pockets.

2

Underwear This is obvious.

3

1L Water Bottle There are many water stations along the Camino. As well much of the drinking water in Northern Spain is clean to drink right from the faucet. The best size of water bottle is 1L. Make sure that you can easily fit this in your bag pocket or that its able to hang on one of your straps.

1

Spoon/Fork Much of the foods that you will end up eating are from the grocery store. You will find that it is not only cheaper but also fun to make food at the hostels. Even if you are only eating only a sandwich having a spoon and fork definitely help throughout the whole Camino.

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Swiss Army Knife A Swiss Army Knife is one of the most useful tools since its essentially multiple tools in one. Whether you need to cut open a bag, fix a caught zipper or open a can, this is definitely a tool you will not regret taking along.

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Antibiotic Cream To prevent any bacterial infections you might get from a cut.

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Bandage Pack For any cuts you might get along the way.

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Antiseptic Hand wash  Some washrooms or places you visit do not have soap or a way for you to clean yourself. Typically it is always good practice to clean your hands to prevent anything infectious from ruining your Camino experience.

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Sunscreen  It’s always a good idea to use sunscreen. You are generally walking for about 6 hours a day and many of those hours are spent under the sun.

1

Soap and Shampoo Most, if not all, albergues and hostels have showers to clean yourself after a long hike. I found it best to bring a shampoo and soap cleaner in one, which is more convenient than carrying two pieces.

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Detergent This is often forgotten about, but you NEED this to do a proper job of cleaning your clothes. Bring a small amount of detergent and only a small pinch is required to sufficiently clean clothes.

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Medicine Handy Pack On the trip you will be exposed and at time your resistance can go down. Common ailments are headaches, sore muscles, diarrhea and allergies. While there are often many pharmacies along the way to purchase this stuff, you never know when or where you will need these medicines.

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Your Medications  You’ll be surprised but many people forget to take their prescribed medicines or even forget to pack enough dosages. Be sure to check with your doctor whether you can be prescribed more medications while you will be walking the Camino. Also make sure that walking an average of 6 hours a day or 22km/day is ok for your body. Its always better to be safe than sorry.

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Download a more detailed PDF checklist here. Or check the same list below